Neu-Yagodnaya-Polyana

Names: 
Neu-Jagodnaja
Neu-Jagodnaja-Poljana
Neu-Yagodnaya
Neu-Yagodnaya-Polyana
Novaya-Yagodnaya
Yagoda
Yakoda
History: 

Neu-Yagodnaya-Polyana (New Berry Meadow) was founded on the Jeruslan River in the Samara province about 65 miles southeast of Saratov in 1855 by colonists primarily from Yagodnaya Polyana. George Kromm stated that 1,620 had gone to Neu-Yagodnaya-Polyana from Yagodnaya Polyana. The other daughter colonies located nearby were Schöntal, Schönfeld, and Schöndorf. Like its mother colony, Neu-Yagodnaya was a Lutheran village and was probably served by the Lutheran pastor of Schöntal, if there was one.

There was much social interaction (visiting relatives, marrying, etc.) between the Volga German colonies located on the Jerusulan River and their mother colonies over 100 miles away.

People earned a living by farming wheat, rye, and oats along with animal husbandry of cows, horses, camels (yes, camels!) sheep, geese, ducks and chickens. Certain trades appeared such as cobbler, miller, blacksmith, cabinetmaker, teacher, shopkeeper and saloonkeeper.

Church: 

Neu-Jagodnaya was a Lutheran colony.

Population: 
Year
Households
Population
Total
Male
Female
1857
 
 
 
 
1859
 
555
 
 
1883
 
1,109
 
 
1889
 
1,312
 
 
1894
 
 
 
 
1897
 
1,466*
740
726
1904
 
1,900
 
 
1910
 
2,219
 
 
1912
 
2,300
 
 
1920
326
2,087
 
 
1922
 
1,580
 
 
1923
 
1,216
 
 
1926**
315
1,485
720
765
1931
 
1,858***
 
 

*Of whom 1,457 were German.
**Of whom 1,482 were German (313 households: 718 male & 764 female).
***Of whom 1,855 were German.

Sources: 

- Diesendorf, V.F. Die Deutschen Russlands : Siedlungen und Siedlungsgebiete : Lexicon. Moscow, 2006.
- Koch, Fred C. The Volga Germans: In Russia and the Americas, from 1763 to the Present (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1977): 313.
- Preliminary Results of the Soviet Census of 1926 on the Volga German Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (Pokrovsk, 1927): 28-83.
- "Settlements in the 1897 Census." Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (Winter, 1990): 18.

Map showning Neu-Jagodnaya (1935).